technology

  • 413
Added a post  to  , technology

Undoubtedly, in the future, man will establish a colony on Mars. What will it look like and which technological solutions adapted to the conditions on Mars will work? Here is the list >>

Added a post  to  , technology

But is it theoretically even possible to time travel?

In the original 1978 Superman film, Superman goes back in time by flying around the globe faster than the speed of light. This is incredibly fast – the speed of light is just under 300,000 km per second!

So far, we have not come even close to this speed, the fastest man-made object, a space probe, traveled at just 150 km per second.

Given the right technological advancements, is it theoretically possible for us to travel faster than the speed of light, and thus, like superman, travel in time?

All the experts agreed that it is not possible to travel faster than the speed of light, this is also specified in Einstein's theory.

Dr Eric Tittley, an expert in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Edinburgh, explains, "It is clear that no object or information can travel faster than the speed of light. It is not a question of not having enough energy to push it that fast. From an external perspective, any extra energy added to a body to get it to and past the speed of light just asymptotically accelerates it to the speed of light."

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

Tesla will branch out from building electric, self-driving cars to produce humanoid robots designed to “eliminate dangerous, repetitive, boring tasks” and respond to voice commands from their owners.

The robot, referred to as Optimus by those inside the company, will be 173 centimetres tall and weigh 57 kilograms. Its body will be powered by 40 electromechanical actuators and its face will feature a screen display.

Optimus will be able to carry a cargo of up to 20 kilograms, and Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk claims that a working prototype will be ready next year.

Speaking at the company’s AI Day event, designed to attract engineering and research talent to the company, Musk said that much of the technology in Tesla’s self-driving cars is applicable to or useful in creating humanoid robots.

“Tesla is arguably the world’s biggest robotics company because our cars are like semi-sentient robots on wheels,” he said. “It kind of makes sense to put that onto a humanoid form. We’re also quite good at sensors and batteries and actuators.”

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

Lamborghini unveiled its revamped Countach supercar at Pebble Beach this week, and as predicted, it’s rocking a little lightning under the hood.

The limited edition supercar is called the Countach LPI 800-4, with LPI standing for Longitudinale Posteriore Ibrido, or Longitudinal Posterior Hybrid; 800 referring to the rounding down of the engine’s 814cv maximum combined power; and 4 to its permanent four-wheel drive transmission. The automaker is releasing the revamped version in honor of the 50th anniversary of the original release.

The revived Countach will have an aspirated V12 engine with a 48V electric motor — meaning the supercar will retain its familiar engine growl while also receiving some of its power from electrons. According to Lamborghini, the thermal unit will have an output of 780cv (a metric unit of horsepower that translates to 574kW), while the e-motor will generate 34cv. That produces a 0–100km/h time of 2.8 seconds, a 0–200km/h time of 8.6 seconds, and a top speed of 355km/h.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

An anonymous hacker who stole more than $600 million from the decentralized finance platform Poly Network this week has returned virtually all of the money — and apparently turned down a half-million-dollar reward offered by the company for exposing its security vulnerability. The bizarre outcome caps off an unusual cryptocurrency heist that has been called the biggest in industry history.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

Apple has announced details of a system to find child sexual abuse material (CSAM) on US customers' devices.

Before an image is stored onto iCloud Photos, the technology will search for matches of already known CSAM.

Apple said that if a match is found a human reviewer will then assess and report the user to law enforcement.

However there are privacy concerns that the technology could be expanded to scan phones for prohibited content or even political speech.

Experts worry that the technology could be used by authoritarian governments to spy on its citizens.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

The Juno spacecraft has gotten a private radio show from Jupiter's closest moon, the highly volcanic Io.

NASA's Juno spacecraft is "listening" in on radio emissions from Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, allowing researchers to discover what triggers the strange radio waves.

Of all the planets in our solar system, Jupiter has the largest and most powerful magnetic field, which extends so far that some of the planet's moons orbit within it. Because Io is closest to the planet, the moon is "caught in a gravitational tug-of-war" between Jupiter and two other large moons, according to NASA. These opposing pulls cause massive internal heat, which has led to hundreds of volcanic eruptions across the moon's surface.

The volcanos release 1 ton of gasses and particles per second into space, NASA said in a statement. Some of this material splits into electrically charged ions and electrons that then rain down onto Jupiter through the planet's magnetic field. Electrons caught in the magnetic field are accelerated toward Jupiter's poles and, along the way, generate a phenomenon scientists call decameter radio waves (also known as decametric radio emissions, or DAM).

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

The new fiber could help satisfy demand for 6G and beyond.

The many-gigabit internet speed records of a decade ago now seem downright inadequate. Motherboard reports that scientists at Japan's National institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have smashed the internet transfer record by shuffling data at 319Tbps. For context, that's almost twice as fast as the 179Tbps a team of British and Japanese researchers managed in August 2020.

NICT managed the feat by upgrading virtually every stage of the pipeline. The fiber optic line had four cores instead of one, and researchers fired a 552-channel comb laser at multiple wavelengths with the assistance of rare earth amplifiers. While the test was strictly confined to the lab, the team used coiled fiber to transfer data at a simulated 1,864-mile distance without losing signal quality or speed.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

Originally built to speed up calculations, a machine-learning system is now making shocking progress at the frontiers of experimental quantum physics.

Quantum physicist Mario Krenn remembers sitting in a café in Vienna in early 2016, poring over computer printouts, trying to make sense of what MELVIN had found. MELVIN was a machine-learning algorithm Krenn had built, a kind of artificial intelligence. Its job was to mix and match the building blocks of standard quantum experiments and find solutions to new problems. And it did find many interesting ones. But there was one that made no sense.

“The first thing I thought was, ‘My program has a bug, because the solution cannot exist,’” Krenn says. MELVIN had seemingly solved the problem of creating highly complex entangled states involving multiple photons (entangled states being those that once made Albert Einstein invoke the specter of “spooky action at a distance”). Krenn and his colleagues had not explicitly provided MELVIN the rules needed to generate such complex states, yet it had found a way. Eventually, he realized that the algorithm had rediscovered a type of experimental arrangement that had been devised in the early 1990s. But those experiments had been much simpler. MELVIN had cracked a far more complex puzzle.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

When Microsoft said that it was going to announce the next version of Windows on June 24, it was only a matter of time before the leaks started coming. The first Windows 11 build leaked today, first offering up some screenshots on Baidu. Now, the full build is here.

First of all, we should be clear that this is very much a new version of Windows 10. It has a big visual redesign, but under the hood, this is the same OS. Microsoft wanted to build excitement around it, so that’s why we’re getting the new branding. Because of this, the first thing you’ll see when booting up this leaked build is a very familiar out-of-box experience.

Indeed, all of the different Windows 11 versions are the same as they were for Windows 10, including Home, Pro, Enterprise, and more. Once you get past that part where you choose your edition, decide how to partition your drive, and it actually installs the bits, that’s where the OOBE takes a left turn from what’s familiar.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

Blue Origin auctions New Shepard ride with Jeff Bezos for $28 million

The bid price soared from $4.8 million to $28 million in under ten minutes

Blue Origin’s month-long auction for a trip to the edge of space with its billionaire founder Jeff Bezos ended on Saturday with a closing price of $28 million. The flight aboard New Shepard, slated for July 20th, will mark the company’s first mission flying humans, in which the winning bidder will bask in a few minutes of microgravity with Bezos, his brother Mark, and one other passenger before returning back to land.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , technology

NASA's new chief is setting up an effort to further study unidentified flying objects within his first month in office.

Bill Nelson, the former Florida senator and spaceflight veteran, told CNN Business' Rachel Crane during a wide-ranging interview on Thursday that it's not clear to anyone — even in the upper echelons of the US space agency — what the high-speed objects observed by Navy pilots are.

Nelson added that he does not believe the UFOs are evidence of extraterrestrials visiting Earth. "I think I would know" if that were the case, Nelson said. But, he acknowledged, it'd be premature to rule that out as a possibility.

Nelson's comments echo the findings of a new Pentagon report expected to be released later this month. Five sources familiar with the results of that study told CNN that US intelligence officials found no evidence that the UFOs are alien spacecraft, but investigators also have not reached a definitive assessment as to what these mysterious objects might be.

"We don't know if it's extraterrestrial. We don't know if it's an enemy. We don't know if it's an optical phenomenon," Nelson said. "We don't think [it's an optical phenomenon] because of the characteristics that those Navy jet pilots described ... And so the bottom line is, we want to know."

Full Article >>