climatechange

  • 178
Added a post  to  , climatechange

For now, life is flourishing on our oxygen-rich planet, but Earth wasn't always that way – and scientists have predicted that, in the future, the atmosphere will revert back to one that's rich in methane and low in oxygen.

This probably won't happen for another billion years or so. But when the change comes, it's going to happen fairly rapidly, the study from earlier this year suggests.

This shift will take the planet back to something like the state it was in before what's known as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) around 2.4 billion years ago.

What's more, the researchers behind the new study say that atmospheric oxygen is unlikely to be a permanent feature of habitable worlds in general, which has implications for our efforts to detect signs of life further out in the Universe.

"The model projects that a deoxygenation of the atmosphere, with atmospheric O2 dropping sharply to levels reminiscent of the Archaean Earth, will most probably be triggered before the inception of moist greenhouse conditions in Earth's climate system and before the extensive loss of surface water from the atmosphere," wrote the researchers in their published paper.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

The semiconductor industry has a problem. Demand is booming for silicon chips, which are embedded in everything from smartphones and televisions to wind turbines, but it comes at a big cost: a huge carbon footprint.

The industry presents a paradox. Meeting global climate goals will, in part, rely on semiconductors. They’re integral to electric vehicles, solar arrays and wind turbines. But chip manufacturing also contributes to the climate crisis. It requires huge amounts of energy and water – a chip fabrication plant, or fab, can use millions of gallons of water a day – and creates hazardous waste.

As the semiconductor industry finds itself increasingly under the spotlight, it is starting to grapple with its climate impacts. Last week Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, the world’s largest chipmaker, which supplies chips to Apple, pledged to reach net zero emissions by 2050. The company aims to “broaden our green influence and drive the industry towards low-carbon sustainability”, said the TSMC chairman, Mark Lui.

But decarbonizing the industry will be a big challenge.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

The world broke a major record last month — although it has little reason to brag about the milestone.

July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released Friday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration — an “unenviable distinction” that could ratchet up anxiety about climate change.

“In this case, first place is the worst place to be,” NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said in a statement. “July is typically the world’s warmest month of the year, but July 2021 outdid itself as the hottest July and month ever recorded.”

He said the record “adds to the disturbing and disruptive path that climate change has set for the globe.”

The world broke a major record last month — although it has little reason to brag about the milestone.

July was the hottest month ever recorded, according to data released Friday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration — an “unenviable distinction” that could ratchet up anxiety about climate change.

“In this case, first place is the worst place to be,” NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad said in a statement. “July is typically the world’s warmest month of the year, but July 2021 outdid itself as the hottest July and month ever recorded.”

He said the record “adds to the disturbing and disruptive path that climate change has set for the globe.”

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

If Earth had a pulse, it might be The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) – a swirl of ocean currents that carries tropical heat north towards polar waters.

Over the past century this global heartbeat has eased, slowing to a speed not seen in more than a millennium. New research based on a range of indices has now bolstered views that the weakening isn't a trivial one, and critical transition is imminent.

The study conducted by climate scientist Niklas Boers from Freie Universität Berlin in Germany is just the latest to point out how the AMOC appears to be inching towards a major tipping point.

His research, recently published in Nature Climate Change, affirms the AMOC can remain relatively stable in two, distinct states.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

Top climate scientists have admitted they failed to predict the intensity of the German floods and the North American heat dome.

They've correctly warned over decades that a fast-warming climate would bring worse bursts of rain and more damaging heatwaves.

But they say their computers are not powerful enough to accurately project the severity of those extremes.

They want governments to spend big on a shared climate super-computer.

Computers are fundamental to weather forecasting and climate change, and computing will underpin the new climate science “Bible”, from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) next month.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

Glaciers are melting more quickly, losing 31 per cent more snow and ice per year than they did 15 years ago, according to three-dimensional satellite measurements of all the world's mountain glaciers.

Using 20 years of recently declassified satellite data, scientists calculated that the world's 220,000 mountain glaciers have been losing more than 298 billion metric tonnes of ice and snow per year since 2015, according to a study in Wednesday's journal Nature.

The annual melt rate from 2015 to 2019 is 71 billion metric tonnes more per year than it was from 2000 to 2004.

Global thinning rates, different than volume of water lost, doubled in the last 20 years.

Half the world's glacial loss is coming from the United States and Canada.

Full Article >>

Added a post  to  , climatechange

Planet Earth is losing 1.2 trillion tons of ice every single year, a new study has confirmed.

The grim milestone was published in the journal Cryosphere, revealing that the loss of ice is up by nearly 60% since 1994, thanks to the acceleration of global warming.

Between the years of 1994 and 2017, Earth lost 28 trillion tons of ice – enough to cover the UK with a 300ft deep layer sheet – a sum which is only set to continue rising as the Earth’s atmosphere continues to rise in temperature.

Meanwhile, sea levels have risen by 1.3 inches globally since 1994.

Full Article >>