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TikTok will be banned in the US from Sunday.

Users in the country will be stopped from downloading the video app as well as WeChat.

If a deal is not struck by 12 November, the app will be fully banned, and using as well as downloading the app will be illegal, according to the order from the US Department of Commerce.

Donald Trump and the US government have threatened to ban the app amid accusations that their Chinese owners mean that American data could be put at risk.

People who already have the app installed will still be able to use it as normal after 20 September. But they will not be able to download new updates, which could quickly mean the app’s functionality will break, since developers will not be able to fix bugs or make changes.

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What is a Viking? The word conjures an unmistakable mental image: the stereotype of bold Scandinavian invaders, fearsome marauders with white skin and pale hair, ruthlessly raiding and voyaging their way across the globe over 1,000 years ago.

Only, there is a mistake after all, it seems – crucial details in this longstanding legend are wrong, new research reveals. According to a large genetic analysis of over 400 Viking skeletons scattered across Europe, many Vikings weren't of Scandinavian ancestry, and many would have had dark hair, not blonde.

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After several teasers and mini-events, Sony has finally revealed the price of its much-anticipated PlayStation 5.
It costs $499, putting it head to head with its rival, Microsoft's Xbox Series X, which likewise is going for $499.
The PS5 will be released on November 12 in the United States, Japan, Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand and South Korea. For other countries, it's coming out on November 19. In a footnote, Sony said that China's launch date is still "under exploration."

The Xbox Series X is coming out on November 10, beating the PS5 to market by two full days. Microsoft is also selling a cheaper Series S for $299.
Carolina Milanesi, a tech analyst at research firm Creative Strategies, said the difference in rival devices' release dates won't make much of a difference in sales.

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Something deadly might be wafting through the clouds shrouding Venus—a smelly, flammable gas called phosphine that annihilates life-forms reliant on oxygen for survival. Ironically, though, the scientists who today announced sightings of this noxious gas in the Venusian atmosphere say it could be tantalizing—if controversial—evidence of life on the planet next door.

As far as we know, on rocky planets such as Venus and Earth, phosphine can only be made by life—whether human or microbe. Used as a chemical weapon during World War I, phosphine is still manufactured as an agricultural fumigant, is used in the semiconductor industry, and is a nasty byproduct of meth labs. But phosphine is also made naturally by some species of anaerobic bacteria—organisms that live in the oxygen-starved environments of landfills, marshlands, and even animal guts.

Earlier this year, researchers surmised that finding the chemical on other terrestrial planets could indicate the presence of alien metabolisms, and they suggested aiming the sharpest telescopes of the future at faraway exoplanets to probe their atmospheres for signs of the gas.

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Doctors and dentists are reporting more cases of cracked teeth and insomnia as the coronavirus pandemic takes a toll on the nation’s stress levels.

PepsiCo’s latest drink Driftwell is pitching itself as a way to combat the problem.

Pepsi employees came up with an idea for a beverage to help consumers de-stress and relax before bed as part of an internal competition started last year by CEO Ramon Laguarta. The concept won, and the food and beverage giant went to work to make it a reality. Emily Silver, vice president of innovation and capabilities at Pepsi’s North American beverages unit, said it is the fastest new product to ever come out of the company. Driftwell will be available nationwide on e-commerce sites in December and in grocery stores by the first quarter of 2021.

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If you're looking for the ultimate computer workstation or esports gaming chair, and you want to pretend you're trapped inside a giant scorpion, your dreams are about to come true.

Behold the Cluvens IW-SK zero-gravity esports gaming chair and workstation. The elaborate chair and desk support one ultra-wide 49-inch monitor or three curved monitors measuring 27 inches each. The unusual contraption also has prebuilt HDMI/DP cables to connect to monitors.

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Americans seem to be listening to more vinyl records amid the pandemic.

In fact, vinyl outsold CDs for the first time since the 1980s, according to a recently released mid-year report from the Recording Industry Association of America. The report underscoring the state of the U.S. music industry captured how people's music listening has changed during the coronavirus crisis.

With people having more time on their hands due to COVID-19 lockdowns, music streaming, which includes revenue from paid services such as Spotify, Apple Music and Amazon, grew 12% to $4.8 billion in the first half of 2020.

The average number of paid music subscriptions was 72 million, up 24% compared to the first-half average for 2019, according to the report.

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The leading model of how the universe is structured says the biggest clusters shouldn’t be as distorted as they appear through telescopes.

Like humans, galaxies can’t stand to be alone. Nudged by gravity, galaxies tend to group together, and some even end up in the universe’s equivalent of bustling megacities: clusters of up to a thousand galaxies, collectively outweighing our sun a million billion times over.

But for all the stars glimmering in these clusters, only a fraction of the entire structure’s mass is visible. As far as scientists can tell, a cluster’s real heft lies within a material that can’t be seen: an invisible, mysterious substance called dark matter. Like the concrete and asphalt beneath a city, a vast spherical halo of dark matter undergirds the whole cluster of galaxies. And just as buildings rise from the city streets, each individual galaxy is embedded within its own subhalo of dark matter.

For decades, astronomers have tried to understand how dark matter acts as the cosmos’ urban planner, shaping the structure of our universe. But the latest looks suggest that whatever dark matter is, it’s not behaving as researchers expected.

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Colorado has recently endured a meteorological rollercoaster, whiplashing between record high temperatures and late-summer wildfires to a record cold snap and snowfall within a matter of days.

The National Weather Service (NWS) reports that Denver experienced temperatures of 38.3°C (101°F) on September 5 and 36.1°C (97°F) on September 6, a record high for September. Overall, it was one of the hottest Labor Day weekends ever seen in Colorado. However, this was closely followed up by a drop to -0.5°C (31°F) on September 8 and 9, which tied with previous record lows in September from 1962. They also received an ample sprinkling of snow on September 8 that turned into a snowstorm, making it the second earliest snowfall on record for Denver.

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Wind is great. It’s proving to be one of the most useful forms of renewable energy of our generation and is helping nations reduce reliance on coal and fossil fuels to generate power.

When it comes to wind, in most cases we need to use massive turbines to convert moving air into kinetic energy that can then be converted into electrical energy using inverters and generators. That power then finds its way directly to the grid to charge our electric cars and boats, or we can store it in batteries to use later.

That’s all kind of cumbersome, it takes a lot of time and energy to build wind farms and infrastructure, and that then comes with a maintenance overhead. Imagine if we could harness the power of wind directly.

Think about it, why spend all that time and money when we can just have our cars or boats propelled forward by the wind?

We could put huge pieces of material, like fixed kites, to catch the wind and drag ourselves forward. In fact, that’s what one group of Swedish engineers has done with its latest car transporting sea vessel.

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Researchers from the University of St Andrews have developed an innovative new technique using lasers to accurately measure the authenticity of some of the world's most exclusive whiskies—without ever removing the cap.

Iconic bottles of whisky have been known to sell for prices over £1 million. But if you are the lucky owner of such a whisky, how can you be confident that the contents of the bottle are the genuine product? Counterfeit drinks cost the UK economy more than £200 million in lost revenue each year, according to a 2018 study published by the European Union's Intellectual Property Office.

New research led by scientists from the School of Physics and Astronomy, published in the journal Analytical Methods, has led to the development of a method using lasers which can see through the bottle to analyze the contents. The challenge in doing so was to record a signal from the contents without recording signals from the glass.

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A newly published study notes that the moon is "rusting," leaving experts perplexed by the discovery.

The research, published in Science Advances, notes that the rust may be a result of water discovered on the moon, but it's still shocking, given the lack of oxygen and dearth of water on Earth's celestial satellite.

"It's very puzzling," the study's lead author, Shuai Li of the University of Hawaii, said in a statement. "The moon is a terrible environment for hematite to form in."

Li was looking at data from the JPL Moon Mineralogy Mapper when the researcher realized the instrument detected "spectra - or light reflected off surfaces - that revealed the Moon's poles had a very different composition than the rest of it," the statement added.

The polar surfaces showed spectra that matched the mineral hematite (Fe2O3), according to the study's abstract.

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