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Many of us enjoy a cup of coffee or two throughout the day, but a new study suggests that too much of the stuff could shrink brain volume and increase the risk of dementia over the long term.

This was a large study as well, involving 17,702 participants aged from 37 to 73, taken from the UK Biobank project. The long-running project collects information on a host of different health and lifestyle metrics, including coffee consumption, brain volume, and disease – as well as additional data like socioeconomic status that scientists can factor in.

The excess coffee risks can jump quite sharply, though you do need to be drinking a lot of the beverage: The study found that people drinking six or more cups a day had a 53 percent higher chance of getting dementia than those who drank one or two cups or less.

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When you're trying to squeeze in a quick HIIT routine or speedy full-body strength workout, the last thing you probably want to do is tack on an extra five-minute warm-up. But just a few simple warm-up exercises can make a pretty big difference when it comes to your performance and recovery.

"Warming up before a workout is extremely important," says fitness instructor and trainer at bande Mindy Lai. "When your muscles are cold, they are harder to move. If you hop into a class with zero warm-up or stretch, chances are you'll walk out with an injury."

Beyond injury prevention, easing in with a warm-up can activate your central nervous system and help prepare your body for movement.

Lai also adds that without an adequate warm-up "you won't get the most out of your workout, because you won't be able to move as limberly from the beginning of class." In other words, kicking things off with some dynamic movement can help support your mobility and range of motion.

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The Juno spacecraft has gotten a private radio show from Jupiter's closest moon, the highly volcanic Io.

NASA's Juno spacecraft is "listening" in on radio emissions from Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, allowing researchers to discover what triggers the strange radio waves.

Of all the planets in our solar system, Jupiter has the largest and most powerful magnetic field, which extends so far that some of the planet's moons orbit within it. Because Io is closest to the planet, the moon is "caught in a gravitational tug-of-war" between Jupiter and two other large moons, according to NASA. These opposing pulls cause massive internal heat, which has led to hundreds of volcanic eruptions across the moon's surface.

The volcanos release 1 ton of gasses and particles per second into space, NASA said in a statement. Some of this material splits into electrically charged ions and electrons that then rain down onto Jupiter through the planet's magnetic field. Electrons caught in the magnetic field are accelerated toward Jupiter's poles and, along the way, generate a phenomenon scientists call decameter radio waves (also known as decametric radio emissions, or DAM).

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Naomi Osaka, four-time Grand Slam tennis champion, had the honor of lighting the Olympic cauldron at the Opening Ceremony of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics on Friday.

The torch always finishes its long journey in the Opening Ceremony venue, being carried around the stadium by notable athletes or other figures from the host country. Those athletes are a closely guarded secret until the ceremony actually happens, so Osaka's presence was a huge surprise.

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Alcohol is estimated to have caused more than 741,000 cancer cases last year, with the majority of cases involving cancers of the oesophagus, liver and breast.

Existing evidence strongly suggests that alcohol consumption can cause various cancers, though the researchers involved in this study believe the links are ‘often unknown or overlooked.’

To indicate exactly how many cancer cases alcohol can cause globally, the team used data such as existing alcohol consumption estimates for 2010 and risk estimates for cancers known to be linked to alcohol and combined the figures with existing estimates of new cancer cases expected for 2020.

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The new fiber could help satisfy demand for 6G and beyond.

The many-gigabit internet speed records of a decade ago now seem downright inadequate. Motherboard reports that scientists at Japan's National institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have smashed the internet transfer record by shuffling data at 319Tbps. For context, that's almost twice as fast as the 179Tbps a team of British and Japanese researchers managed in August 2020.

NICT managed the feat by upgrading virtually every stage of the pipeline. The fiber optic line had four cores instead of one, and researchers fired a 552-channel comb laser at multiple wavelengths with the assistance of rare earth amplifiers. While the test was strictly confined to the lab, the team used coiled fiber to transfer data at a simulated 1,864-mile distance without losing signal quality or speed.

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Top climate scientists have admitted they failed to predict the intensity of the German floods and the North American heat dome.

They've correctly warned over decades that a fast-warming climate would bring worse bursts of rain and more damaging heatwaves.

But they say their computers are not powerful enough to accurately project the severity of those extremes.

They want governments to spend big on a shared climate super-computer.

Computers are fundamental to weather forecasting and climate change, and computing will underpin the new climate science “Bible”, from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) next month.

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Italy's victory in the UEFA Euro 2020 football championship final last Sunday is likely to add 0.7 percent to the country's projected gross domestic product (GDP) growth this year, local economists have said. This will certainly be welcome news for an economy struggling to emerge from a slowdown brought on by the coronavirus pandemic.

Italy's dramatic 3-2 penalty shootout win over England on Sunday earned the Italian side their first European title since 1968 and their first world title since their 2006 World Cup victory.

According to studies, the feat is also sparking new rounds of domestic spending and attracting investments from abroad as it has helped boost consumer confidence and improved the image of Italy and Italian products abroad. This boost may be temporary, analysts said, but is still significant.

All in all, the Italian national football team's Euro 2020 victory is projected to "result in an extra 12 billion euros (14.2 billion U.S. dollars), or around an extra 0.7 percent growth in gross domestic product," Simona Caricasulo, an economist specialized in sports-related topics at Rome's LUISS University, told Xinhua on Thursday. She said the impacts would be felt almost exclusively this year.

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For the past 30 years, Carol Anniuk has provided accommodation and guides for recreational fishing trips in northwestern Ontario. In normal times, 99% of her clients are American. But more than 15 months after Canada's restrictions on nonessential travel went into effect to slow the spread of COVID-19, Anniuk, the owner of Young's Wilderness Camp, doesn't know when her U.S. clients will be able to cross the border.

"I'm just frustrated," she sighs. Anniuk has taken on a lot of debt since the coronavirus pandemic began in her tourism-dependent area, a six-hour drive from Minneapolis. She bemoans "the lack of communication and the lack of a plan" from the Canadian government on when to begin admitting most visitors from the United States.

Canadians can fly to the U.S. but can't cross by land, and most non-Canadians cannot enter Canada either by land or by air. The two countries continue to extend their travel measures — which are not the same in both directions — month by month.

In the latest step, which began July 5, the Canadian government lifted a mandatory 14-day quarantine for fully vaccinated Canadians and permanent residents returning to Canada. However, federal ministers have resisted providing a timeline or clear benchmarks for next steps in admitting more visitors.

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Ferocious tyrannosaurs and towering sauropods are long gone, but dinosaurs continue to frolic in our midst. We’re talking about birds, of course, yet it’s not entirely obvious why we should consider birds to be bona fide dinos. Here are the many reasons why.

Make no mistake, birds are legit dinosaurs, and not some evolutionary offshoot. All non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out following the asteroid-induced mass extinction 66 million years ago, but some species of birds—probably ground-dwelling birds—managed to survive, and they wasted no time in taking over once their relatives were gone.

“Those little guys singing outside your window are the dinosaurs we have left these days,” Adam Smith, curator at Clemson University’s Campbell Geology Museum, explained in an email. “Birds are just one type of dinosaur. Saying ‘birds descended from dinosaurs’ is akin to saying that people descended from mammals. Simply put, all birds are dinosaurs, but not all dinosaurs are birds.”

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Argentina beat Brazil 1-0 in Saturday’s Copa America final to secure the national team’s first title in 28 years, win their first major title since 1993, and Lionel Messi finally lifts his first major trophy for the national team.

Argentina’s winning goal at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro came in the 22nd minute after Rodrigo De Paul made a long pass to Angel Di Maria.

The 33-year-old veteran striker counted on some sloppy defending from left-back Renan Lodi to take control and lob it past goalkeeper Ederson.

It was only the third goal Brazil conceded in the tournament.

Brazil piled on the pressure in an exciting second half but even with five strikers on the field, they could not get an equaliser against the Argentinian defence protected by the outstanding Rodrigo De Paul.

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The Milky Way is 13 BILLION years old. Some of our Galaxy’s oldest stars were born near the beginning of the Universe itself. During all these eons of time, we know at least one technological civilization has been born – US!

But if the Galaxy is so ancient, and we know it can create life, why haven’t we heard from anybody else? If another civilization was just 0.1% of the Galaxy’s age older than we are, they would be millions of years further along than us and presumably more advanced. If we are already on the cusp of sending life to other worlds, shouldn’t the Milky Way be teeming with alien ships and colonies by now?

Maybe. But it’s also possible that we’ve been looking in the wrong place. Recent computer simulations by Jason T. Wright et al suggest that the best place to look for ancient space-faring civilizations might be the core of the Galaxy, a relatively unexplored target in the search for extra terrestrial intelligence.

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